Belgrade Serbia

Highlights

We would like to show you some of the highlights of Belgrade.

These highlights are part of our history so they are part of our lives.

However, Belgrade Greeters also want to show the things that you will not find in a guidebook or are hard to discover if you are just wandering about.

 

Music festival (ENTER)

Music festival (ENTER)

“ENTER” is a new, well-arranged festival organised in Belgrade. It will hold stage for “Prti Bee Gee”, “Pero Defformero”, “Inna”, “Bvana”, “Iskaz”, “Struka”, “DJ Nemax”, “Lee Leed” and many more!
Surprisingly,there’s no fee to be paid and is completely free. It will be held from 28.06.2018 to 30.06.2018. This seems to be very promising and you certainly won’t be disappointed by it’s performance.

Nightlife

Nightlife

What does Belgrade have to offer?
You could say many open-air nightclubs, pubs, caffe’s, indoor clubs, concerts, shows, events and theatre plays. We certainly don’t know which one is better from the rest, as we remain amused by all of them, thanks to Belgrade and it’s Greeters. Come and join us, whereas you will see for yourselves.

 

Summer festival (BELEF)

Summer festival (BELEF)

During the hot sommer days of July and August, Belgrade is a host to a wonderful festival, which is called BELEF. It consists of many different genres of music, art, theatre and dance.
People usually bring back good memories and enjoy their time during the festival. It is intended for people who like art,music or dance, however some who previously didn’t like these, remained very amused by BELEF. That is, the festival has a lot to offer. Come and join us, to celebrate this wonderful Belgrade gem, from 22.06.2018 to 15.07.2018

Museums

Museums

Belgrade is a host to many museums, ranging from art, history, science and music.

You shouldn’t miss Nikola Tesla’ museum, national museum of Serbia, military museum and many more which a greeter will guide you through. The fees are extra for each museum.

Riverside

Riverside

Belgrade’s riverside is host to many boat-nightclubs, restoraunts and amusing sunsets. People take walks here with their loved ones whilst enjoying a cup of coffee during the sunrise or sunset, both of which are beautiful.

Saint Sava’s temple

Saint Sava’s temple

The temple is centrally planned, having the form of a Greek Cross. It has a large central dome supported on four pendentives and buttressed on each side by a lower semi-dome over an apse. Beneath each semi-dome is a gallery supported on an arcade.
The domes have 18 more gold-plated crosses of various sizes, while the bell towers have 49 bells of the Austrian Bell Foundry Grassmayr.
The central dome mosaic depicts the Ascension of Jesus and represents Resurrected Christ, sitting on a rainbow and right hand raised in blessing, surrounded by four angels, Apostles and Theotokos.

It is 82m high and can receive 10,000 faithful at once. The central dome is 4000 tonnes heavy and beneath the floor of the church, there are vaults and the crypt of Saint Sava as well as the burial church of Holy Prince Lazar, totalling 1800 m² in area. The cathedral is clad in white marble and granite, while the murals are mosaics.

In 1895, three hundred years after the burning of Saint Sava’s remains, a small church was built on the place of the burning. It was later moved, so that the construction of the temple could begin. The first and second balkan war stopped the work on the temple so it wasn’t until 1985 that the selected architect Branko Pesic began the building of the temple.

(After the 1941 bombing of Belgrade, work ceased altogether. The occupying German army used the unfinished church as Wehrmacht’s parking lot, while in 1944 the Red Army, and later the Yugoslav People’s Army used it for the same purpose.)

Knez Mihailova street

Knez Mihailova street

Named after Knez Mihailo Obrenovic, a serbian emperor, who is considered to be the most enlightened ruler of modern Serbia. He advocated the idea of a Balkan federation against the Ottoman Empire. He was a prince in-between 1839–1842 and 1860–1868, having ruled for about 11 years.

The street follows the central grid layout of the Roman city of Singidunum, as one of the main access roads to the city corresponds to the modern street today. To this day,in Knez Mihailova street there is the famous “Nikola Spasic” Passage, homes of lawyers, bussinessman and many other notable people of Serbia.

A famous street in Belgrade, which many tourists, as well as domestic visitors, like very much. This is due to it’s beatiful architecture, interesting performances and stores. In it’s neighbourhood, there are many museums and hidden gems of Belgrade, which the Belgrade Greeters can’t wait to show you! Come and spend your time with us, to truly see what Belgrade has to offer.

Kalemegdan Fortress

Kalemegdan Fortress

Belgrade Fortress consists of the old citadel(upper and lower town) and Kalemegdan park (great and little). It is located on the confluence of the rivers Sava and Danube, in an urban area of modern Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. It was declared a Monument of Culture of Exceptional Importance in 1979, and is protected by the Republic of Serbia.
It is the most visited tourist attraction in Belgrade, having over 2 million visits per year. There is no entrance fee to be paid.
The great Kalemegdan park occupies the southern corner of fortress, with geometrical promenades, the Military Museum, the Museum of Forestry and Hunting, and the Monument of Gratitude to France. At the location of the Monument of Gratitude to France there was a monument to Karađorđe which was dedicated on 21 August 1913. During the Austro-Hungarian occupation of Belgrade in World War I, the Austrians planned to erect the bronze monument to their emperor, Franz Joseph I on that very spot so they melted the Karađorđe’s monument to reuse the bronze. When the Franz Joseph monument was being shipped to Belgrade in 1918, Serbian forces captured the ship and confiscated the statue. It was later melted into three church bells, largest of which still tolls from the belltower of the Ružica Church today.

The Roman Well is 60 meters deep, completed in 1731 by the Austrian rule of Belgrade, officialy. However, on the site of today’s Kalemegdan was a Roman fortress “Kastrum” 2000 years ago, where water was conducted to the fortress from the distant water sources. Since the Romans were experienced strategists and skilled builders, it was logical that they will try to dig a well, so the soldiers would be equipped with water in case of siege when the enemy could cut the water supply. There is quite a story behind the Roman well, in 1494, Belgrade was the most important Hungarian, but also the Christian stronghold against the Turks, so the story goes that in the war with the Turks where the Austro-Hungarians barely managed to defend themselves and during one of the battles they have captured 37 Turkish prisoners. The prisoners were tortured in cruel ways which brings chills whenever you pass by the well.

Upper town, upper section of the fortress, was turned into a park, with beautiful promenades and the statue of “The Victor” (Serbian: Pobednik), the so-called “Roman well” (Serbian: Rimski bunar), actually built by the Austrians, the Popular Observatory (since 1963) in the Despot Stefan Tower, the türbe (tomb) of Damad Ali Pasha, Mehmed Paša Sokolović’s Fountain, tennis and basketball courts, etc

Lower town (Donji grad) occupies the slope towards the riversides, between the top and lowest spot and Danube, where Nebojšina Kula sits. It has been turned into a museum of the Greek revolutionary Rigas Feraios, who was strangled by the Turks in this tower and his corpse thrown into the Danube. Donji Grad, like the neighboring Savamala, frequently suffers from flooding, and Kula Nebojša suffered extensive damage during the major floods of 2006. The Orthodox churches of Ružica (former Austrian gun depot) and Sveta Petka are also located in this area, as well as the Belgrade Planetarium.

Little Kalemegdan park contains the city zoo whilst the great Kalemegdan park is home to the future Gondola lift and Pavilion on Sava promenade.